BANANA PUDDING

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In a Food and Wine article by Aaron Hutcherson (June 3, 2020), the writer said: “… in 1920, and in 1921, Mrs. Laura Kerley from Bloomington, Illinois, shared the first-known printed recipe for the dessert [called Banana Pudding] utilizing cookies in her local paper. Seeing a business opportunity, the National Biscuit Company took advantage of banana pudding’s popularity and started printing a recipe for the dessert on Vanilla Wafers boxes in the 1940s. (They officially became “Nilla Wafers” in 1967.) Nabisco’s marketing efforts for the cookie surely played a factor in helping to further spread the joy of banana pudding to the masses.”  All I know is that Banana Pudding was one of my grandmother’s special desserts, and hers was the absolute best.  I’m sure she used the recipe off the box of Vanilla Wafers, and if that recipe was good enough for her, it’s good enough for me.  No need to tweak this recipe or serve it in gimmicky Mason jars or pour caramel sauce all over it. This is the real deal, simple, familiar and delicious.

Ingredients

BANANA PUDDING

    Directions

    Step 1

    Make the custard: In a saucepan over medium heat, combine 1/2 cup sugar with flour and milk. Whisk vigorously. Add the beaten egg yolks, and continue whisking and stirring around the edges of the pan until you have a thick custard. Adjust heat as necessary. The custard should be quite thick.

    Step 2

    Slice 4 or 5 bananas.

    Step 3

    Put some custard on the bottom of your souffle dish, and start the layering process.

    Step 4

    Add vanilla wafers. Then proceed to make 3 or four layers. Custard, bananas, and then wafers.

    Step 5

    You want to wind up with bananas and custard on top.

    Step 6

    Make the meringue: With an electric beater, whip the egg whites until they thicken and start to hold their shape. Slowly pour in remaining 1/4 cup sugar and beat until you have a stiff glossy meringue.

    Step 7

    Bake at 350 degrees for 10 minutes. Check after 5 minutes. You want the meringue to be a toasty brown, not burned, and the higher your meringue swirls, the easier it will be to burn the tips of them!

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